The Organometallic Reader

Dedicated to the teaching and learning of modern organometallic chemistry.

Resources for Organometallic Chemistry

with 2 comments

What resources are available for the interested organometallics student?

What resources are available for the interested organometallics student?

Let’s face it: organometallic chemistry is a somewhat esoteric subject. Unfortunately, this fact makes it difficult to find cheap, current textbooks on the subject, but there are a few used gems for sale on the Internet. Crabtree’s Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals is a short but solid book that’s a good jumping-off point for deeper studies. Spessard and Miessler’s Organometallic Chemistry is a longer but still informative classic. Hartwig’s “biblical” Organotransition Metal Chemistry is a nice reference work, but I wouldn’t start off with this back-breaking tome. If you do, skip around and avoid the vast sections of text describing “what’s known” with little explanation.

For the penny-pinching student or layman, there are several good resources for organometallic chemistry on the Web. Nothing as exhaustive as Reusch’s Virtual Textbook of Organic Chemistry exists for organometallic chemistry, but the base of resources available on the Web is growing. Rob Toreki’s Organometallic HyperTextBook could use a CSS refresh, but contains some nice introductions to different organometallic concepts and reactions. Try the electron-counting quiz!

VIPER is a collection of electronic resources for teaching and learning inorganic chemistry, and includes a nice section on organometallic chemistry featuring laboratory assignments, lecture notes, and classroom activities. Awesome public lecture notes are available from Budzelaar at the University of Manitoba and Shaughnessy at Alabama (Roll Tide?). For practice problems, check out Fu’s OpenCourseWare material from MIT and Shaughnessy’s problem sets.

What did I miss? Feel free to contribute your favorite resources in the comments below. Keep an eye on the right-hand sidebar for a growing collection of online OM chemistry resources.

Written by Michael Evans

January 1, 2012 at 12:33 pm

2 Responses

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  1. Owen Summerscales

    February 16, 2012 at 6:01 pm

    • Thank you! Awesome resources there.

      mevans86

      February 16, 2012 at 6:03 pm


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