The Organometallic Reader

Dedicated to the teaching and learning of modern organometallic chemistry.

Epic Ligand Survey: Metal Alkyls (Part 1)

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Epic Ligand Survey: Metal Alkyls (Part 1)With this post we finally reach the defining ligands of organometallic chemistry, alkyls. Metal alkyls feature a metal-carbon σ bond and are usually actor ligands, although some alkyl ligands behave as spectators. Our aim will be to understand the general dependence of the behavior of alkyl ligands on the metal center and the ligand’s substituents. Using this knowledge, we can make meaningful comparisons between related metal alkyl complexes and educated predictions about their likely behavior. Because alkyl ligands are central to organometallic chemistry, I’ve decided to spread this discussion across multiple posts. We’ll deal first with the general properties of metal alkyls.

General Properties

In the Simplifying the Organometallic Complex series, we decomposed the M–C bond into a positively charged metal and negatively charged carbon. This deconstruction procedure is consistent with the relative electronegativities of carbon and the transition metals. It can be very useful for us to imagine metal alkyls essentially as stabilized carbanions—but it’s also important to understand that M–C bonds run the gamut from extremely ionic and salt-like (NaCH3) to essentially covalent ([HgCH3]+). The reactivity of the alkyl ligand is inversely related to the electronegativity of the metal center.

Reactivity decreases as the metal's electronegativity increases.

Reactivity decreases as the metal's electronegativity increases. Values given are Pauling electronegativities.

The hybridization of the carbon atom is also important, and the trend here follows the trend in nucleophilicity as a function of hybridization in organic chemistry. sp-Hybridized ligands are the least nucleophilic, followed by sp2 and sp3 ligands respectively.

Note that this trend is similar to the nucleophilicity of carbanions as a function of hybridization.

Note that this trend is similar to the nucleophilicity of carbanions as a function of hybridization.

The history of transition metal alkyls is an intriguing example of an incorrect scientific paradigm. After several unsuccessful attempts to isolate stable metal alkyls, organometallic chemists in the 1920s got the idea that metal-carbon bonds were weak in general. However, later studies showed that it was kinetic instability, not thermodynamic, that was to blame for our inability to isolate metal alkyls. In other words, most metal alkyls are susceptible to decomposition pathways with low activation barriers—the instability of the M–C bond per se is not to blame. Crabtree cites typical values of 30-65 kcal/mol for M–C bond strengths.

What are the major decomposition pathways of metal alkyl complexes? β-hydride elimination is the most common. Thermodynamically, the ubiquity of β-hydride elimination makes sense—M–C bonds run 30-65 kcal/mol, while M–H bonds tend to be stronger. The figure below summarizes the accepted mechanism and requirements of β-hydride elimination. We’ll revisit this fundamental reaction of organometallic complexes in a future post.

What kinds of alkyl ligands violate the requirements for beta-hydride elimination?

What kinds of metal alkyl complexes violate the requirements for beta-hydride elimination?

Kinetically stable metal alkyl complexes violate one of the requirements for β-hydride elimination. Methyl and neopentyl complexes lack β-hydrogens, violating requirement 1. Tightly binding, chelating ligands may be used to prevent the formation of an empty coordination site, violating requirements 3a and 3b. Titanium complexes are known that violate requirement 4 and eliminate only very slowly—back-donation from the metal to the σ*C–H is required for rapid elimination (see below).

Reductive elimination is a second common decomposition pathway. The alkyl ligand hooks up with a second X-type ligand on the metal, and the metal is reduced by two units with a decrease in the total electron count by two units. I’ve omitted curved arrows here because different mechanisms of reductive elimination are known. We’ll discuss the requirements of reductive elimination in detail in a future post; for now, it’s important to note that the thermodynamic stability of C–X versus that of (M–X + M–C) is a critical driving force for the reaction.

The thermodynamics of reductive elimination can present problems for some alkyl complexes.

The thermodynamics of reductive elimination can present problems for some alkyl complexes.

When X = H, reductive elimination is nearly always thermodynamically favorable; thus, isolable alkyl hydride complexes are rare. This behavior is a feature, not a bug, when we consider that hydrogenation chemistry depends on it! On the other hand, when X = halogen reductive elimination is usually disfavored. Reductive elimination of C–C (X = C) can be favored thermodynamically, but is usually slower than the corresponding C–H elimination.

Complexes that cannot undergo β-hydride elimination are sometimes susceptible to α-elimination, a mechanistically similar process that forms a metal carbene. This process is particularly facile when the α-position is activated by an adjacent electron donor (Fischer carbenes are the result).

Oxidative addition followed by alpha-elimination, forming a Fischer carbene from an alkyl complex.

Oxidative addition followed by alpha-elimination, forming a Fischer carbene from an alkyl complex.

In some metal alkyl complexes, C–H bonds at the α, β, or even farther positions can serve as electron donors to the metal center. This idea is supported by crystallographic evidence and NMR chemical shifts (the donating hydrogens shift to high field). Such interactions are called agostic interactions, and they resemble an “interrupted” transition state for hydride elimination. Alkyl complexes that cannot undergo β-hydride elimination for electronic reasons (high oxidation state, d0 metals) and vinyl complexes commonly exhibit this phenomenon. The fact that β-hydride elimination is slow for d0 metals—agostic interactions are seen instead—suggests that back-donation from a filled metal orbital to the σ*C–H is important for β-hydride elimination. Here’s an interesting, recent-ish review of agostic interactions.

A generalized beta-agostic interaction, with a specific example.

A generalized beta-agostic interaction, with a specific example.

In the next post in this series, we’ll explore the synthesis of metal alkyl complexes in more detail, particularly clarifying the question: how can we conquer β-hydride elimination?

Written by Michael Evans

March 1, 2012 at 12:45 pm

3 Responses

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  1. The source for the agostic interactions is great. I actually worked with a few students on a poster about the author (Maurice Brookhart)…he is one that really developed evidence for this type (3 atom 2 electron) interaction.

    AMF

    March 2, 2012 at 1:54 am

  2. Do you mean to say neopentyl instead of “neopenyl”?

    ps. sorry it has been ages, but I am back to reading!

    AMF

    March 23, 2012 at 7:47 pm

  3. […] breaks. Transition metal complexes can participate in their own version of β-elimination, and metal alkyl complexes famously do so. Almost by definition, metal alkyls contain a nucleophilic bond—the M–C bond! […]


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